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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/07/2020 in all areas

  1. I hope I have posted in the right section. It is a tool I guess. I would like to share with you if you don't already know a way to bring back the shine on old pocket watch movements. In the photos I grabbed an old barrel from the parts bin and dipped it in Shinebrite for about 10 Min. Then I placed it on bolsa wood and give it a scub with a medium hardness small paint brush for a few more minutes. Rinse it under the tap and yeah the shine is back. I do this with stained plated movements as well. Gets rid of tarnish better than other methods I know.
    2 points
  2. If I train her on repairing watches, I will be embarrassed over time:)
    2 points
  3. Move house? Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    2 points
  4. Hi! Haven't had much time for watchmaking practice, for way to long time!! But finally!!! Well almost done with the st 96 project. First started. And first finished. And, im very pleased! I have to say, it was very frustrating at times. Many small issues. Most done by my own "fine" work.. I did source a replacement balance. Or, I got offered by a gentleman. So, I did install it. But the watch did not run very clean at all. With low aptitude. Was a bit concerned, to say at least. But I managed to get it to work reasonable on the timegrapgher. So I decided to b
    1 point
  5. I also picked this up. New condition, still in its original packaging for a quid. Looks ideal for "winding up" the Brexiteers. The listing stated “Unused but the battery has run out some time ago”.. I'm sure there is a joke in there somewhere.
    1 point
  6. I guess it'll have to be...
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  7. Definitly nice and shiny now. If Shine bright is the same as the UK silverdip it will contain mild abrasives and ammonia, just have a careful sniff. it will clear you sinuses.
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  8. Certainly a universal movement holder, good quality too
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  9. I don't advice to use any old cleaning agent. These modern cleaners off the shelf who knows what damage they can do. Never ever use anything like Cillet Bang on antique clocks (antique) I mean any thing from the first decade of the 20th century. Heaven knows what it can do to brass and steel. You might think it looks nice to have a bright shining movement but that doesn't make it go.
    1 point
  10. Everyone here has been extremely insightful and welcoming. All of the feedback is awesome! I cannot thank everyone enough! Ill give some things a go! Wish me luck - will feedback results!
    1 point
  11. Solved by the wisdom of my wife. She said to use a hair blower on the socket and then push it it. It worked amazingly. The manufacturer should recommend this as punching it, jumping in and and taking a sludge hammer to it did not work. Simple wife trick...that’s why we have to listen to our significant other from time to time...and I’m the Engineer:)
    1 point
  12. I have put 224 lbs over the socket to push the ball in without luck. Sludge hammer may be the next move. For a $1000 bucks and import fee, this should not be an issue.
    1 point
  13. Please forgive the poor quality snapshot, but it all came together. I am over the moon! Here's my first completed fordite-dialed watch: I'll provide a more complete write up, better photos, and another completed watch example ASAP.
    1 point
  14. Quick update: I've cut my first series of fordite veneers, and I'm in the fun-but-difficult stage of assembling my first run of dials. Here's a scan of my first workable batch of fordite sections (ranging in thickness from 0.3mm to 0.5mm). The final patterns of these will change, as I'll be grinding them down to their final height. (This is a good thing, as some of the patterns below are pretty uninspiring. It'll also be heartbreaking, as some of my favorites below will likely shift too.) It's coming together!
    1 point
  15. Unless you fancy a challenge it's worth looking at the websites of the usual parts suppliers first. The Resources page you'll find a link to at the head of this forum is a good place to start. I can see for instance Cousins has both male and female stem parts listed. I'm sure other suppliers closer to your neck of the woods might be able to oblige too. Also a good tip to a newbie is not to focus exclusively on the movement model you're specifically dealing but be aware of models in the same family. In your case http://www.ranfft.de/cgi-bin/bidfun-db.cgi?10&ranfft&&2uswk&a
    1 point
  16. I got thinking I should lay this out, the way I’d do it. Which is not to say “best” or “only” way... to get that deep, wet look shine, the most important thing is flatness. Or consistency of curve on curved surfaces. So, we need it flat, and to stay flat. For these index rings I’d start with shim stock. It is ground flat and parallel. It comes in plenty of thicknesses. But shim is much flatter than flat stock. This makes life easier. the jig you have is great. Good thinking there. I’d prepare it with a random orbit sander. Work through the grits; probably could start a
    1 point
  17. This is coming along nicely! i’ve been following this and finally I can contribute. If you want to get a “black” polish on the index ring, you need a large, lose and flappy wheel with very fine rouge. A small Dremel wheel is going to produce swirl marks that’ll drive you insane. Even on the sides of a watch case, I use a 6” wheel, not a 1” wheel.
    1 point
  18. So, I've debated sharing the proof of concept picture below, as it's with an imperfect fordite dial slice and the fordite itself hadn't been polished. It's not even a particularly compelling cut of fordite; I'm going to be selecting the most visually appealing dial veneers I can. The failure rate of the section cuts is quite low (the material is really easy to work with, and stronger than it looks), so I can afford to be selective in my dials. This was one of my first attempts at a complete dial. The problem here is that I didn't start with a perfectly flat and even piece of fordite -- af
    1 point
  19. I would soak it up with cotton wool, take it outdoors, put it in an open can and set fire to it. Will quickly burn away.
    1 point
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