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  1. Poise is correct We can find many similar shaped pallets from that era, also called "moustache" pallet. But soon they found that the so increased inertia is much worse than some imbalance and these moustaches disappeared. Frank
    4 points
  2. If you haven't before worked on watch movements I recommend that you start with one that works, and consider enrolling the course on watchrepairlessons.com Otherwise it will be much more difficult to learn expeditely.
    2 points
  3. @AndyHull is the hmt man, got a truck load of them, none works.
    2 points
  4. anybody heard about hmt watch before ...?
    1 point
  5. That is an Hamazawa mov't, you can search the Internet to learn about it. You can release the stem lifting the lever above it. It is almost certainly beyond repair but good to learn on. If you measure it is possible that it can be replaced with something else, or search for a working donor watch .
    1 point
  6. Not 100% accurate, at least two of them work. I may have one or two corpses spare part donors, but most of my HMTs do in fact work just fine. OK, maybe they didn't when I purchased them, but with a little TLC, they now work perfectly. You are just jealous that I have the yellow-est non after-market dial HMT ever created.
    1 point
  7. I disconnect the balance complete to get it out of harms way. Refer to picture No2 you posted. What looks like an hour hand screwed on the cock, that either pushes on end stone to keep it in place, or end stone is fitted in it. It can be pushed to the side or if you can remove the little screw thats on it, balance jewel under neath smiles at you.
    1 point
  8. watch bridges are pretty unique. some like the eta 1080 were copied a great deal.But the fhf 96 not so much. one thing i have to say about the India watches is that the cases are generally made from a decent grade of stainless steel, it is a hot country and people sweat. you need a watch there that wont corrode on your wrist
    1 point
  9. If the key is turning and nothing is happening look closer at the very inner coils of the mainspring. If none of it is moving you either have a broken eye on the end of the mainspring, or a broken hook on the arbor of the winder so its not engaging the spring. If the last few cm of the spring is winding up but not the rest of the spring then the mainspring is broken and will need to be replaced. The only way to check is to dismantle but make sure you remove the power on the alarm side first. If you haven't already I suggest buying a book on clock repair. One that isn't too expen
    1 point
  10. An old & close friend brought me his father's watch...after some other "repair" person's apprentice got done with it. It was supposed to only get a cleaning. He insisted on springing for parts and supplies, but largely it's my favor to him. I couldn't charge labor on top of what they put him through. This shop assistant (I'm guessing) didn't appear to know how dials came off. The base plate seems to be marred from prying. The dial was fractured and divoted where that foot was located. And that foot has the tip broken off, and that foot screw was missing when I received the watch. Hmm
    1 point
  11. If Orient USA has the parts and will sell to an individual domestically, you can use a reshipping service or ask here for some member to help you out.
    1 point
  12. Thank you Praezis. That had me a bit stumped. I have an 1888 Hampden, size 6s, and I was really sure I would have noticed a crescent-shaped projection like that on the lever. But I got to second guessing and was ready to go peek. This is what I love about this forum: odds are pretty good that someone on here knows something obscure that I don't, and which I may take forever to find on the internet. So, "Mustache" levers sound like they were a bit of a flash-in-the-pan as it were.
    1 point
  13. yea I heard it too anyway this one is keeping good time
    1 point
  14. Thanks for sharring the info Carl. Best wishes Joe
    1 point
  15. If you do open it be aware that as the watch was manufactured in the 1940's (apparently for the Canadian market) the lume WILL BE RADIUM, so take the appropriate care....................
    1 point
  16. Hello there. I know I am resurrecting another old thread but I wanted to let you know that I am 99% sure your watch is original and all the bits go together, apart from the hands where at least one is wrong, as they are not a pair, and probably both (they were probably luminous originally). As has been said the movement is a Helvetia 81-24, this movement was introduced in 1929 when Helvetia patented their new shock protection system. Helvetia is a brand I collect and have a site on, they only numbered the bridges of their movements for a short period around 1930. The serial number on
    1 point
  17. New member here. I've gone through all three courses, and now I've disassembled and cleaned the Seagull ST36 6497 and I'm in the process of putting it back together. Need help getting the right mainspring winders for the movements I'm working with (6497, Seagull ST2100 [ETA 2836], and Seiko NH35A) I currently mod watches (create and lume my own dials, re-brush and re-polish cases, tune bezel action, add sapphire crystals, etc.) Got into watch repair because I screwed up the keyless works on one of my ETA 2836 based watches and watched Mark's YouTube videos to fix it. Thanks
    1 point
  18. There is a possibility that its to do with the balance and poise of the pallet, as well as being decorative.
    1 point
  19. HMT I believe stands for Hindi Machine Tool which is an Indian company, possibly government sponsored, set up in the early 1960's. They use Citizen designed movements made under license in India and produce some fairly good budget watches.
    1 point
  20. Which as you wrote them are the same part numbers. Now, I had answered this before, but can do that again it here. Tecnically speaking there is no designation such 7S26 and no letter. Since its introduction, Seiko has placed a letter at the end, that is A, B, or C in chronological order of introduction. When someone refers to 7S26 and no letter, in a technical context that can introduce ambiguity. To help on the matter I have summarized all these changes is a document, here's it again: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1sYt_mI9c4tAPiKN3IM8lQx3NEEOyz2DMjVHx5I1_Mqw/htmlview
    1 point
  21. That's not good enough, assuming you measured on a full wind with the correct parameters. I'd take that back. Be careful telling them that you used a timegrapher. Sometimes that causes the argument of "you think you know everything just because you are able to measure something". It may be easier to say that the timekeeping wasn't as good as expected and you had it measured by someone else.
    1 point
  22. What you have got is called Niello which is a surface decoration technique for silver. Google Niello and you will get lots of info but here's a link that may be useful.
    1 point
  23. Hello all, I need to find parts for this military watch from Abercrombie & Fitch from the 40’s. I don’t think it is an Heuer movement but was wondering if anyone could help ID it. I looked on Ranfft site but could not tell how to begin a search. Thanks for the help. Ps it has a sundial for seconds in lower center.
    1 point
  24. Hello all, I know this is a relatively old thread but in case anyone was wondering why Roland was saying he could find plenty of spare movements but Doreen couldn't it's because their two watches use different movements. Doreen's is the larger Cal 51 which is only really used in these pilots watches and is therefore difficult to find spares for. Roland's uses the smaller Cal 81 which as he says was used a lot and is very similar to the 82A as used in the Helvetia German DH watches. You can tell the difference even from the dial. In the 51 the sub dial completely covers the 6. In
    1 point
  25. I'd concur with @HSL making this specifically a Helvetia 81-24. In which case you might find this of interest: https://www.helvetiahistory.co.uk/movements
    1 point
  26. First I was thinking of a FHF then I changed my mind and will go with a The General Watch Co - Helvetia, Helvetia 81. If you can get a shot so one can see the keyless I think it will be easier to identify....
    1 point
  27. I think the set lever screw goes on before barrel bridge dose, did you not get a datasheet for this? If too many missing parts, a scrap/spare movement hurts wallet less. ST96 has been made in India for sometime now, cheap and good for spare. Lighter fluid is available in supermarkets( you save on shipping) inexpensive and works real well. I keep like 10mml in small jar, cork keeps the fluid from vaporizing and leaving the jar. Good for final clean and rinse of complete balance& cock, fork and all gears/ pinions.
    1 point
  28. With the exception " independent manual wind" , module gears in all auto winders engage as you wind manual, said gears turning doesn't mean you have spotted an issue, thats how they all are and suppose to be and yes that do put extra load on winding manually. The issue you may have is, the said load might be abnormally excessive, in which case you are highly likely to have another issue with the winder that you have not yet spotted, and that is the question of, the winder efficiency. A normal day's wind on wrist is your actual power reserve, so measuring the reserved power during a normal
    1 point
  29. I think so. Easy to test, remove the auto works and try if it becomes any easier. You can also count how much de-multiplication there is from crown to barrel by counting respective turns, maybe it is not a very favorable ratio. The wheels are lubricated internally by dropping them in the solution. I do not recommend tobuy at the crazy prices asked, but simply make you own as described in the many topics on the subject. Before dwelling in another debate consider that in your case the auto works appear to pass the first test of not spinning the rotor when hand winding, the second
    1 point
  30. "Five bar". I think I've heard that before; and looking at the movement I get it now. I think my friend didn't take it back to that shop to undo the damage simply because he no longer trusted them, and wasn't sure they could correct it. I do not know why (or if) he chose not to sue. But the other puzzling thing, as my friend related the tale, was that the head jeweler/repairman of the shop handed this watch to his (then) brand new apprentice to service. Why would he do that? I mean, sure, this is no Patek Phillipe or Vacheron Constantine, but doggone it, man, it's somebody's prized Sw
    1 point
  31. Its a pity the person didn't take it back and told them to put it into the same condition as when they took it to that incompetent person, they should have sued them. Because of the damage they have inflicted on that watch they have removed any value to it. The movement is called a 5 bar movement and are normally Swiss made. Good luck with what you are willing to do in helping your friend, not an easy task. I look forward to the video if you record one.
    1 point
  32. Thank you for getting back with me. I will definitely contact him for this matter. Beautiful watch you have there, it’s a early flieger; I really like it. Mine is very similar with yours; it’s a flieger German watch from WW2 1941-42
    1 point
  33. Hi Doreen, Sorry for late reply. Here is the website of Andy http://www.timeworldservices.co.uk/ I have a bought a few watches of him and he has serviced and repaired a few of my most delicate watches. Service level is top notch and cost is reasonable. I am not familiar with the movement designations you refer to but the movement layout is rather specific so it is easily identified from pictures with form of bridges and the unique anti shock spring. My watch is a German Flieger from 1935-1938. I Have also found DH watches with the same movement and civil watches similar to the DH.
    1 point
  34. Should have included a pic. Screws will always have opposing screws.
    1 point
  35. Hi Doreen Find attached a comprehensive list of watch lift angles for future use, The Helvetia is not on the list un-fortunatly . The problem with the rate is usually down to one or two things, the mainspring which you have changed or the balance and its components. With a watch of that vintage it will have been repaired a few times in its life so therefore is a bit of a lottery as regards parts fitted in the past. things to check are is the balance spring clean and free in its action and not sticking due to oil or magnetism, and is it the correct one.. is the balance its self the correct
    1 point
  36. That’s the nice thing about watches and clocks. Its not just about the money. You have the pleasure of owning the piece.
    1 point
  37. Well..... I have fallen in love with the little movement. Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
    1 point
  38. Says adjusted in three position and rare and unique shock protection, if dial and hands are in good shape and the rest Genuine, I would seriously look into restoration.
    1 point
  39. The case is a Francis Borgel waterproof case it looks too early for the movement, but it appears to have import marks on the inside of the case so you should be able to date the case from the date letter, I would put the case from 1910-1920 so too early for that movement.
    1 point
  40. I collect WWII watches and sometimes you come around a similar movement, Helvetia 82A. This one seems more like it's past 1945.The Value is what someone is willing to pay for it.
    1 point
  41. That's a sweeping statement that I don't agree with Vinn. It very much depends on what you intend making or repairing.
    1 point
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