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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/09/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    qhartman

    Is this to far gone?

    Yeah, definitely not for the faint of heart. I've done similar work and it takes forever. If you're patient though, you can get good results. For those interested, here's a primer on the technique: http://jewelrymonk.com/2014/08/05/how-to-solder-and-fill-a-pit/ It would be a bit different here givens the size and quantity of the pits, but not too different. The biggest change would be for the big, wide pits I wouldn't do the wire technique, I'd just try to flux and flow solder into them en masse. One thing I would add is to start with hard solder to do your first round, then go to medium solder, then to easy. That way each layer you add requires less heat and you don't melt out your previous work.
  2. 2 points
    I have been thinking about this and I think you have two issues. I think the first fault showing as a wavy pattern is caused by inconsistent power coming through to the escape. The second fault is there is something wrong on one side of the escape. See the attachment, although a different machine the same readings analysis applies. Timing-Machine-Charts-.pdf
  3. 1 point
    Ronda 715 Service Walkthrough I thought I'd post a walkthrough on a simple quartz movement for people who are just starting out in watch repairing. The Ronda 715 is an excellent movement to begin with, as it's simple in design; but has all the components needed to practice your skills on. Even better is that it only cost around $10 to buy this movement brand new online. So if you break it or loose a part, you learn from the experience, and just buy another one :) Perfect!! The Ronda 715 is found in many of the "Fashion" brand watches, like Guess, JAG, Loyal, etc... As this is a walkthrough for novices there will be arrows to every part as we disassemble this movement. I also recommend you download the Tech Spec PDF and get familiar with how to read them. Here's the link to down the PDF 559_Ronda702,703,705,708,712,713,715.pdf Remember to have fun!! :lol: If you start to get frustrated, just have a break and come back to it later. Patience and perseverance will get you there, and once the skills are mastered it's very rewarding. Ok, lets begin Firstly, you identify this particular caliber of movement by the number stamped into the plastic surround. As you can see this one is stamped "715" The tools you will need for this service are as follows: Bergeon 4040 Movement Holder An Eye Loupe, or some type of optics 3x or better Pegwood 0.8mm Screwdriver 1.2mm Screwdriver Tweezers Hand Lifters A Hand Setting Tool A Parts Tray with cover And a piece of Rodico Since I am using a movement purchased from CusionsUK, I unfortunately don't have Hands or a Dial to remove. If you are servicing a movement presently in a watch, I suggest you watch one of Mark's video's to see how you remove Hands and the Dial. Mark's Videos are a fantastic resource to show you proper technics, and I highly recommend viewing them. They can be found here: https://www.youtube.com/user/jewldood/videos Once the Hands and Dial are removed, we then need to remove the battery, if one is installed, before we begin disassembly. On this movement it is done by gently pulling the Keeper Arm back away from the battery. Be careful when doing this so that you don't slip and damage the Coil. Then turn the movement over and remove the 4 screws, using a 0.8mm Screwdriver, that hold down the Date Indicator Guard, and remove it. Here is a reference photo of the Date Indicator Guard and screws. Next, hold down the Jumper Spring with Pegwood to stop it pinging away, and remove it with your tweezers. Then remove the Date Jumper and Date Indictor Ring. Next remove the Indictor Driving Wheel Then the Date Indicator Plate Followed by the Hour Wheel. Next remove the Setting Wheel Remove the Minute Wheel Remove the Secondary Yoke This completes all the components on the dial side of this movement. Turn the movement over in the holder. Unscrew the 3 screws, using a 1.2mm Screwdriver, that holds the Module Cover Plate, and remove it. NOTE: One of the screw is unique and larger than the others, remember it's location. Here is a reference photo of the Module Cover Plate and the 3 screws. Next remove the single screw that holds the Circuit and the Coil. Then remove the Circuit VERY carefully and store it somewhere very safe. Here is a reference photo of the Circuit and screw. Next remove the Coil by lifting it with the end with no circuit tracks on it, as shown below. Now unscrew the 2 screws, using a 1.2mm Screwdriver, that holds the Train Bridge and lift it off gently. Here is a reference photo of the Train Bridge and screws. Next remove the wheels of the train carefully, then the Rotor and Stator. From left to right there names are: Third Wheel, Second Wheel, and Intermediate Wheel. And here are the Rotor and Stator. Unscrew the single screw, using a 1.2mm Screwdriver, that holds the Centre Bridge and remove it. The Cannon Pinion should be on the centre post of the bridge and come away with it. NOTE: This screw is also unique with a thicker head, remember it's location. Here is a reference photo of the Centre Bridge, Cannon Pinion and screw. Next remove the screw, using a 1.2mm Screwdriver, that holds the Plastic Setting Lever Cover, and remove it. Here is a reference photo of the Setting Lever Cover and screw. Then lift out the Setting Lever and Primary Yoke. Lastly, pull out the Stem and the Sliding Pinion should fall to your work mat. You have now completely disassembled the movement ... WELL DONE!! :) The black plastic outer ring can not be removed, it is riveted to the Main Plate All the parts can be put in the cleaning machine or Ultrasonic ... EXPECT THE FOLLOWING PARTS! Battery Circuit Coil Rotor I hope this was a fun movement to begin your journey into watch repairing, and that it builds your confidence to advance further. Assembly will be posted soon...stay tuned!
  4. 1 point
    jdrichard

    Making a Balance Staff

    Need to make a balance staff for a European picket watch. The old staff had both pivots broken off. First I disassembled the watch and removed the balance staff. Removing the roller table was the hardest part because it was a Three arm balance and my Magic Roller Remover would not work so I used the scissor type. I then determined the widest diameter of the balance staff and found a 2.0 mm piece of Blued Steel. I cut off 1 inch and sized the collet, and inserted in into my Boley Leinen Lathe. I then started to cut the Balance and Hairspring side by first using the old staff as a guide and marking the piece of steel with my carbide graver. I started cutting down the first diameter where the balance fits and simply cut and measure until it was snug but still room to stake it in place. I then cut the hairspring diameter next and fix and cut repeatedly until it was snug. I used a special gauge to measure as I went along. Once the part fit was good I worked on the pivot with the graver until I got it down to around 0.2 mm and then used a stone to get it to around 0.14. The rest I plan to do on a Jacot tool. I then flipped the part around with a different collet and started working the Roller Table side using the same technique. I Amos finished off the plate where both the rolled table on one side and the balance on the other side rest. Slight error in the description. I left the full part in and started working on the roller table side before cutting off the part and flipping it around...saves time. I worked on the other pivot as well and got it down to 0.14 with a graver and then a stone...on the Lathe. The final product looked great. I am waiting for a set of vintage pin gauges to get the pivot size exact. Will finish it off next week. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
  5. 1 point
    Jon

    Making a Balance Staff

    Nice to see that being done... Thank you
  6. 1 point
    Chopin

    A. Schild 1746/47 assembly help

    The movement that I had had a different spring than yours. It was shorter and it was flat not rounded. Something like this. Might be a good idea to check that the one that you have is the right one.
  7. 1 point
    oldhippy

    A. Schild 1746/47 assembly help

    That is the wrong way around.
  8. 1 point
    Gpsluvr

    A. Schild 1746/47 assembly help

    I’ve never seen this one in person but it looks awkward with the long leg on the right side. Try turning it over and see how it looks and works. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
  9. 1 point
    oldhippy

    A. Schild 1746/47 assembly help

    It goes here. You should have a small plate that goes over it and screws down in that hole near the arrow.
  10. 1 point
    Chopin

    A. Schild 1746/47 assembly help

    The spring is supposed to hold that small part/pivot next to it in tension which in turn will hold the calendar wheel in splace. It'll prevent it from moving in the wrong direction but allow it to rotate in the right direction.
  11. 1 point
    Chopin

    A. Schild 1746/47 assembly help

    I believe it goes here.
  12. 1 point
    Geo

    Is this to far gone?

    Wow, it looks like the surface of the moon. By "too far gone" I assume you mean regarding refinishing and not just use. Personally I would be a bit reluctant to try and buff our the pitting unless you measure the case thickness and depth of the worst pit mark.
  13. 1 point
    It's hard to know how your pallet stone ended up on top of one of the escape wheel teeth, but I think it would be fair to describe it as "mis-locking". I suppose it could have happened during impulse, but I still think the same term applies. There is no way that a pallet stone should ever be able to sit on top of an escape wheel tooth. Are you sure that this happened? It's hard to tell from a 2D photo. Inserting a fold of tissue paper underneath the pallet fork slows the action to help you to inspect what is happening. You should wind the mainsping just enough for the lever to be able to snap back-and-forth, and then use a find oiler or a needle to move the fork from side to side. You need to know what to look for as you cycle through the 15 (or so) teeth. While locked, there should be "draw" which is a small amount of recoil that gives safe locking by drawing the pallet stone deeper into the escape wheel teeth. The pallet fork will resist moving very slightly, and will return to its original position if it does not unlock (and will be "drawn" back in). When the pallet fork is moved far enough for the escape wheel tooth to escape, you should observe impulse as the escape wheel tooth ramps along the pallet stone. The impulse is actually divided in two stages, but it's not worth mentioning here as it would be very difficult to observe, and doesn't really matter for your purpose. When the escape wheel tooth eventually drops off the pallet stone, the escape wheel is then free to rotate by a certain angle. This is called "drop" and is wasted energy, but it is necessary in order to allow freedom of movement in the escapement. If yoiu reduce drop too far then the escapement will jam (mislock). Higher grade movements tend to have less measurable drop. There are two drop angle measurements; "inside drop" and "outside drop". Inside drop is the angle of rotation of the escape wheel when it lands on the exit pallet (the locking face is "inside" the pallets). Outside drop is the angle it rotates when it drops off the exit pallet and lands on the entry pallet locking face (whidh is on the "outside" of the pallets). This drawing may help show where to look to see the angle of rotation where it says "drop". Look at the size of this gap which is currently showing the "outside drop". This distance should look similar to the "inside drop" : As a very simple test though, I would also just check the shakes on both the pallets and escape wheel and make sure that the pallet stones can never reach above or below the escape wheel teeth.
  14. 1 point
    manodeoro

    TIMEX/KELTON plastic bezel repair

    Here are some pics I took while servicing and reluming my « Black Rallye » Envoyé de mon iPhone en utilisant Tapatalk
  15. 1 point
    manodeoro

    TIMEX/KELTON plastic bezel repair

    It could work and there’s no risk trying so let us know how that works. BTW ... I have one of those aluminium/plastic bezel on my « Rallye » KELTON from 1975. I definitely love that one and she often sits on my whist. Envoyé de mon iPhone en utilisant Tapatalk
  16. 1 point
    JerseyMo

    TIMEX/KELTON plastic bezel repair

    Indeed wow! I have one Kelton Diver and it has the aluminum bezel with spring clip. Too bad Timex did not use this across all of the watches with a ring. But, they did final improve the rings in the late 70's and make the ring of aluminum with an inner ring of a more flexible plastic. These can be taken apart and clean very easily. have a look at some of those in my collection. I think I need some more yes?
  17. 1 point
    Thanks for the info, I am just waiting for the all my tools to arrive to get underway. Looking forward to the process.
  18. 1 point
    Endeavor

    The "Screw-peg" ®

    Hello All; Surely "invented" before, but I've never seen it..... therefor I call it the "Screw-peg" ® Struggling to get a 70-years old NOS ladies movement to run properly, I had some serious pegging of very small jewels to do, including the very small balance pivot jewels. (if curious, read https://www.watchrepairtalk.com/topic/9705-servicing-laco-503-501/) My experiences with these tiny holes are that if you get the tip of peg-wood in the jewel-bore, it brakes off easily. Next to that, once you got the peg-wood in, while rotating, your fingers slide & rotate down. Once the fingers are to the end of the peg-wood, and some more pegging is required, you either have to pull the wood and try it again or; try, with the peg-wood still in the bore, to get your fingers back on top of the peg-wood ........ with a very high probability that the peg-wood tip brakes off; left behind stuck in the jewel Something had to be thought of ........ ; I had a box full of toothpicks which were 1.6mm in diameter. One of my screwdrivers took 1.6mm steel tips. I removed the steel tip, cut one end of the toothpick off and inserted the toothpick in the screwdriver-handle. It's a nice press fit. The toothpick-tip can be sharpened multiple times by either a knife or dressing it on a diamond stone. Now, with the peg-wood tip in the jewel, you can rotate as long as you deem required. I also found to have very high control over steadiness, angle, rotation and applied pressure. It works for me like a treat ! Of course the ® isn't
  19. 1 point
    JohnHutchins

    Timex M25 what to start first???

    Mark has a nice video in which he explains how to relume hands. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=GyEB2yDBXbM
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