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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/21/2018 in all areas

  1. 2 points
    Gary

    Watch Lume first attempt

    Hi Everyone! While I often times share my failures I am not as quick to share my successes! I have been limited in time but I have tried to dedicate a few hours to watches. It makes me happy! Below is my first attempt at a set of hands on an old Coleman beater pocket watch. I have to say getting the ratios correct and balanced is always going to be a challenge but I’m pleased with the results! in the lightlight exposure 1 minute lights off and I didn’t like the chapters yet, only the hands. I’m satisfied! Thanks everyone! Gary Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  2. 2 points
    dadistic

    Help please

    Try searching for LIR1620. They come up on US Amazon, and powerstream.com has a data sheet for it. It is, however, 3.6 volts. Cheers!
  3. 2 points
    PeterS

    Unitas 6497 shock spring replacement

    Actually, I have some stones for sharpening knives. Several grades up to mirror finish. I’ll have to give it a go one evening. There are three possibilities why it doesn’t fit, I think I’ll only be able to do it if it is the option ‘1’ as per my picture.
  4. 2 points
    anilv

    Junk evaluation

    The memosail is a high-end watch and some parts are not available. the dial and hands will probably be of value to someone. The omega pocketwatch is nice but they're not really worth big bucks. They dont have balance protection so the balance is probably broken. I would save the citizen for late once you've gotten some practice on simpler stuff. The Orient is a good starter watch.. better than most chinese clones. Not sure of the vedeor but should have a jewelled escapement and this would be a good starter watch, especially if it has an Incabloc shockprotection. Don't feel bad about the fact the dealer may have given you a valuable watch, he's a professional (or should be) and should know better. The usual reason for orphaned movements is 1)the shop replaced a non-runner with another working movement or 2)the case was gold and that was sold for scrap. My guess is (1) for your bare movements like the Citizen and Memosail. Another scenario is the older watch repair guy is no longer around and the new guy has no use for these things. My personal experience, after checking the movement of a watch that's sent to me for service, I have sometimes found that the watch is not repairable or would cost to much to repair. After telling the owner the news some have opted not to repair but have later come back after having sourced a similar watch/movement and requested me to do the transplant. They usually have no interest in the original unusable movement so it goes in my part stash. Good luck and have fun! Anilv
  5. 1 point
    kevinb95

    Junk evaluation

    Nice score on the Memosail, those are pretty cool looking watches.
  6. 1 point
    TerryMcCabe

    Mainspring question

    Thanks to everyone. I measured the old spring couldn't find it at cousins but did find it through the "pocket watch database" and ended buying it on ebay.
  7. 1 point
    JohnR725

    Help please

    We don't have a technical data sheet for the Sony battery but on the back we do see it's a Rechargeable lithium-ion battery. The LIR1620 Is also a lithium ion rechargeable battery with a data sheet mentioned above found at the link below. Non-rechargeable lithium batteries are magnesium dioxide-based. So both are lithium batteries different battery chemistry means different voltages and different characteristics. Non-rechargeable batteries typically do not like to go into the circuits were there being charged bad things usually happen. https://www.powerstream.com/p/Lir1620.pdf
  8. 1 point
    mousekar

    Mainspring question

    Hey Terry, I have some experience with this as I’ve been working with a Waltham 0 size as well. There are three model numbers of mainspring to choose from. The main difference being the width. You’ll have to measure either the width of the old mainspring or the inside of the barrel wall. Should be either: 1.5mm, 1.7mm, or 2.0mm. Remember when you measure it may not be exact. If you measure the barrel wall, choose the closest one that is the smallest, so you have room for the cap to fit. Otherwise the mainspring will stick out the top. I would recommend alloy. I have found plenty of fine examples on eBay, ofrei if you don’t mind paying a little more. One last thing. I have had trouble with mainsprings slipping on the Walthams. After doing a little research, it seems you have to put a small bend at the arbor side so it will catch on the hook of the arbor. I have not verified it yet, but there is info out there with a google search. Here are the model numbers for you: https://pocketwatchdatabase.com/reference/mainsprings/waltham Hope that helps get you started. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  9. 1 point
    viem70

    Poljot 3133 problem

    After disassembling and cleaning all the parts I got the watch working and showing similar problems. Then I payed more attention to the balance. I have seen similar problems with the 7s26 Seiko movements in the past. Basically, I learned that every time the hairspring is mounted to the stud with the adhesive, there is a good chance this adhesive finds its way out to the hairspring and causes the spring coils to catch (this is offten irregular, i.e. it doesn’t affect every swing). In the past, I noticed this happens when I clean the balance with too strong cleaner. In this case however I did not suspect this is the problem because this movement was not cleaned since I bought it new. Anyway, after I noticed the coils stick together when I press them against each other, I cleaned it with One Dip and then took a very small piece of lintless paper and walked it through the coils carefully several times. This finally made the balance clean and not catching. Timing machine showed much nicer characteristic.
  10. 1 point
    rodabod

    BHI 2018 Examinations

    Hi Olivier! I was going to email you about the mechanical watch exams. Hope they went well. @oldhippy, regarding the exam format, I used to agree with what you are saying, ie. all you need is to learn on the job, and if you can “do it” then that proves that you know it. However, I’ve changed my mind after completing the BHI courses. The theory exam uses various methods to prove that you understand from first principles how everything works. It’s the only simple means that they have of determining that you really understand an aspect in depth. So for example, they ask you to explain via diagrams and text how the drive is delivered from the crown to the winding pinion. Some people will make the mistake of thinking that the stem directly drives the winding pinion for example. All of the theory behind metallurgy I’ve learned through the course syllabus, and it’s just not something that I’ve learned through experience. I notice that many people on this forum know little about the subject - eg. the correct carbon content and temper for a wristwatch screw. A few of us “watchies” struggled more with the clock theory questions. And we realised that it would have been much easier if we’d spent more time physically working on them. So that in itself proves that working on the job helps to aid your understanding of theory. Or alternatively, your understanding of theory proves that you’ve worked on the job..... I think one of the best things about the BHI is that they set a benchmark for the standard of work which watchmakers provide. I’m not saying that anyone who posts here is a “bodger”, but we’ve all opened up enough watches which have been mucked about with by other watchmakers. The practical exams let you prove that you can work to a certain standard, and the theory exams reinforce that by showing that you understand how it works underneath. For me at least, I know that my watchmaking (and clockmaking) skills have improved massively since studying the Theory and Practical courses, and I suppose that’s the main thing that matters for me.
  11. 1 point
    Lawren5

    Gear Train Binding

    OK, problem solved. It appears that when I removed the cannon pinion, I damaged the center wheel tube by elongating the opening. This caused it to bind on the shaft of the sweep seconds wheel. I was able to make the opening round again by inserting the pointed leg from a pair of dividers into the opening. It no longer binds and the gear train now turns freely.
  12. 1 point
    oli

    BHI 2018 Examinations

    Hi Roddy, I was there (Olivier), it was nice meeting you, I did not realise you were on the forum!
  13. 1 point
    Meanwhile, back at the original question, I think it’s important to establish the objective, and then clarify the options and outcomes. The OP describes an ambition to get back to the original 100m waterproofness, so let’s look at that. JDM’s answer above is about the extent of it. If you can find an accrediter repairer who has a Wenger parts account, they may be able to obtain a new crown with the Wenger logo on it. They will fit the crown using the correct grade of loctite to attach it to the stem, if necessary, they can replace the case tube, they will lubricate the stem and seal with the correct lubricants (both different), refit the stem and a new caseback seal (also lubricated), and then pressure test to confirm all is good. My guess is that this would cost £70 to £100. If the correct crown is not available then a similar style generic one could be fitted and the cost could be a little less. A quick google search suggests that someone like InTime might be able to do this. It is unlikely you will find a repairer who is willing to fiddle around with trying to replace the crown seal. If you want to tackle this yourself then you have the choice of trying to find a replacement o-ring as JDM describes, or a generic crown. Loctite is optional, but adds security against the crown coming off, so I would reccomend. A pin vice is preferable to hold the stem, but smooth jawed pliers would do for a one-off. Silicone grease for the seal is recommended, but you could get away with not greasing the stem. So you should be able to do all this for around £20. You may need to shorten the stem or pack the hole in the crown if it’s a little short... read the sticky thread on fitting a new stem. Let’s assume you don’t want to spend hundreds or more on a pressure tester, so you will be guessing that all is good when you've finished. You pays your money and takes your choice.
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