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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/08/16 in all areas

  1. Sometimes with old movements after you go through the normal cleaning cycles including pegging the jewels, you still find old oil that has turned to hard varnish left in the oil sinks. This has happened to me on a few occasions and I started thinking there has to be an easier way than soaking in acetone and going through the pegging process again. A couple of weeks ago I was at the dentist and found the answer in my mouth............the ultrasonic probe. When returned home, I fired up my iPad and started searching eBay for a second hand dental unit and got lucky. I managed to get the unit for my initial bid of £40 complete with five new sterile probes. It was only after buying it I realised it had to be plumbed into a water supply, and I didn't think my good lady would fancy a hose connection in the kitchen, and I certainly didn't fancy cleaning watch movements in the garden. The problem was solved by purchasing a 5ltr garden sprayer for £8. Now that I had all the kit it was time to try it out, so an old movement plate was found with the necessary hard residue in the jewel. The result to say the least was staging, a gentle clean lasting about 10-20 seconds per side and the jewels were spotless. I just love lateral thinking! Below are some pictures to let you see the setup and the results. I only cleaned two of the jewels in the plate. The complete setup. The control box. Water must be flowing when in use, and don't touch the brass with the probe. Two jewels cleaned. Spotless!
    2 points
  2. I finally worked up the nerve to potter about inside the guts of a watch. A friend of mine came to visit just the other day and showed me a rather inexpensive "Winner" brand mechanical wind-up watch he bought off Ebay (new) for $12. The problem was that his youngest son (a ten year old) had popped open the crown so violently that the stem broke. My friend went off to the local flea market to see if he could get the watch repaired cheaply but the owner of the stall he frequents was away and his wife could not repair the watch BUT she did potter about in her husband's spare parts bin and came up with two stems which would likely fit the watch and charged my friend a dollar for both stems. So he turned up at my place on Sunday and asked if I could have a look. I screwed the "glass window" caseback off easily. It required minimal effort and seems not have been closed properly tight at the Chinese factory. Anyway, I peered inside with my magnifying specs on and looked at what was obviously a Tongji SCM movement with seventeen jewels. I knew that the little winding stem release point was easy to work with these watches and, luckily, a bit of the old stem was still sticking out. So I used a micro screwdriver to push the release point and a pair of fine tweezers to pull the broken stem piece out. It worked! Next I took one of the stems my friend had bought along and wiped some WD40 on it with a cotton bud. I then pushed the crown in and, miracles of miracles, it locked in first go! I was able to wind the watch and adjust the hands without any trouble at all. I was very proud of myself for overcoming my shaky hands and silly eyes to have achieved this simple repair. I then put the caseback back into position and used my caseback tool to tighten it up. There was no rubber seal to deal with at all which I thought a bit odd. Anyway, the watch is now working and my friend reports it gains less than 15 seconds a week. Not bad for $12 !!!
    1 point
  3. Here are some a few of the Dueber Hampden pocketwatches I have collected or were handed down. Mostly 12s and a few 16s, 4 are 21j. Also have some wristers in the bags. In the box are some of my wearers, including: Longines 25j 994.1 cal, (last of the thins), some 4 & 5 jeweled Seiko quartz, Seiko 27j bellmatic, couple Seiko 5 Actus 21j autos, these are daily wearers. I do have a penchant for Seikos! Hey, how did that junky old Rolex get in there?!?! Now you know why I started repairing. :D
    1 point
  4. Have been fiddling around with this for a while: 90mm diameter nickel plated case. Note the hole to the top of the hour hand from a screw used to substitute a broken dial foot. Inside is a 59mm (26'''?) Landeron 8 day movement: The movement was patented by Amedee Douard in 1893 (see here:http://worldwide.espacenet.com/publicationDetails/originalDocument?CC=CH&NR=7032&KC=&FT=E). It winds & runs well, but the pivot on the 2nd wheel attached to the cannon pinion (does the same job not sure if it's the correct term for this) has sheared so no power to the hands: and here's the culprit out of the watch, the sheared pivot is the 2nd item from the left: Have searched high & low for a replacement to no avail, and I would suspect that making a new part would be cost prohibitive. Any suggestions?
    1 point
  5. I've got my setup about how I want it - for the time being. Having no dedicated space, I've organized my desktop bench with the tools I use the most. The less frequently used tools are in plastic ammo boxes in the closet. When set up, my kids' homework desk becomes my work area. Right top drawer Left top drawer Bottom drawer I've still got some extra room, but I don't want to overload my bench, since it still has to be portable. When I'm done working it gets moved to the credenza and covered with a dust cover. I need to get an adjustable chair, better lighting, and figure out a more permanent storage spot for my bench when I'm not using it. Other than that, I'm good until the kids move out and I get a proper bench - something I'm in no hurry for. :mellow:
    1 point
  6. Only problem with this system is watches running...faster? (out of dentist panic!) :) Excellent idea and result! I could use something like that for some plates myself! Cheers, Bob
    1 point
  7. I like it when people from non-watchmaker backgrounds just go "I wonder if this works?" Some great things happen. Thanks for another idea Geo.
    1 point
  8. Thanks for the warm welcome, I was mistaken about my current project, the AS 1916 cal was in a Croton 17j auto, which came in an auction lot I won last week, it appears to be virgin,(no case scratchings on inside), upon examination, turned out really decent, removed mvt from case, cleaned and polished, set about trying to find any trouble, but nothing worth mentioning. I did recall having difficulty with stem detent screw, then I watched one of Mark's vids warning against unscrewing too far, sadly too late, but on the upside, I was able to hold detent with fine tweezer while tightening from below, really a "three handed" job, but it tightened back up and it's running fine, and looking well.
    1 point
  9. This should help you Stephen :- https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=sites&srcid=Z2xlYXZlYW5kY28uY29tfHRlY2huaWNhbHxneDo1OTQwZTE1YzkyZWY1NmZi The green that you are seeing will be verdigris and it should come off with some careful cleaning in a solution of baking soda. Add half a teaspoon of baking soda to a cup of water the soak the parts in it until the verdigris disappears. You can gently scrub with an old toothbrush to help remove the corrosion. https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=verdigris&rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB648GB648&oq=verdigre&aqs=chrome.1.69i57j0l3.4094j0j7&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8&hl=en-GB#imgrc=_
    1 point
  10. This field is best learn, as it has been ever since, in a mentor-apprentice or senpai-kouhai setting. In this age of online forums and the likes, I consider Mark as my senpai. So just like Mark, I'll have some of my balls hang in the air. And so far I like the cool feeling. :D
    1 point
  11. DON means dot over ninety . The little dot that is next to the 90 . The later speedmasters have the dot next to the 90 . Like this? DON bezel. Dot next to 90 When Omega serviced the speedys they often changed the bezel. This makes the DON bezels worth a lot of money this days.
    1 point
  12. Fantastic. Very innovating. You could even save some money and clean your own teeth. Just kidding :)
    1 point
  13. Geo you are a canny lad. Interesting & initiative well done. The only issue I thought of is could you dislodge a jewel if over zealous.
    1 point
  14. My dentist used to use one of those, but for some reason (sadism possibly?) has reverted back to the old bolster & chisel method.
    1 point
  15. An omega speedmaster. Kind of a watch every watch collecter will get one day.
    1 point
  16. Not at all ash. I don't use this forum as a means to gain business. However, Geo is correct, I have been incredibly busy on the bench taking on more work than usual due to an unexpected loss of earnings in another area. Regretfully, I have quite a few balls in the air currently but I'm hoping things will calm down soon for me lol. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    1 point
  17. One of my other hobbies is furniture making, and it's supposed to be all fine furniture, as in no compromises on quality and the "look". I have now completed the desktop extension that is at the heart of this thread and I can state that it is probably the most utilitarian, aka, ugly, piece of furniture I've ever built, as you can see in the attached photo, with nary a dovetail joint anywhere. But, at least so far, it works, though whether it will survive the test of time remains to be seen. The height seems right, and I can comfortably rest my elbows on it, and I can spread them out also. The 2 drawers will accumulate lots of junk in short order as they're roomy. And I do have a gas lift chair so should I need to adjust my height for some reason, it'll be easy. Thanks to you all for the great advice you gave me. Now I need to do something constructive with it I suppose! Like fix watches perhaps?
    1 point
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