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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/19/14 in all areas

  1. I would wager that they are heat treated as is customary in this level of finish...but I don't know for sure! As far as color, it can be controlled if you have precise control of the heat levels. If you've every blued a piece of metal, you can watch it go through multiple colors and in that, varying degrees of blue. As far as imperfections go, if the piece is perfectly polished and cleaned, you can get an amazing Blue finish with really no visible flaws. But, it is NOT easy! Believe me as I've spent the better part of a day re bluing a set of screws for an antique pocket watch. Speaking of Blued screws, that is the one thing about this movement that I really don't care for. Traditionally, blued screws were usually done on lower grade finishes and typically paired with guilded movements. Polished screws were usually used with nickel finished or "white" movements... Don
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  2. Its my eyes Mark, have officially become a blind old bugger! :phew:
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  3. OK Don, you are the closest :D Notice the hack is not touching the balance timing screws (the crown is out), but rather, it has wedged itself on top of a balance screw somehow. So this watch was at a dead stop as a result. Luckily there is no damage - I have released it from the balance and it functions as normal. It's a given - I will definitely film this one. It's the first one I have had so I am going to enjoy this :)
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  4. lol sorry for my English... noooooo pas de superglue.. not at all..
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  5. Thats a lovely watch Ian - well done mate :)
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  6. Nice Omega but they are expensive ! :(
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  7. Hmmmmmmmmmmmm nice watch Ian! I was given an F300 Seamaster "Cone" for refurbishing a couple of watches for a friend last year. Not one I'd be inclined to overhaul myself though.
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