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    The Patron and Subscribers section in the WatchRepairLessons.com dashboard (direct link) will detail all your subscription details. 

    This will help me consolidate all my videos under one roof rather than maintaining two separate systems, and it will also help clean up WRT a bit.

    If you have any questions please message me, Mark :)

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  • Recent Topics

  • Posts

    • Hi Dan, Welcome to the forum.
    • A soak in diesel fuel, naphta for day or two,  ends the old story of heads popping off the screws. I remove balance cock pallets and soak the rest, give one dip in a fluid I can stand the odor of. Any cheap multipurpose oil would do. I use several solutions, detergent seperately and brush extesively.  
    • Hello forum folks, I've been tinkering with watches for maybe 5 years now. I'm very much a beginner but I have been practicing on cheap watches and movements that it is ok to break. I've managed to make my own watch dial from a brass sheet, including brushing, rhodium plating, printing, and creating applied markers and numerals. I've also made a "smart" watch using epoxy-based putty for the case and my electronics knowledge. I have some basic skills in metal finishing including polishing and plating. So I've mostly worked on the non-movement aspects of watchmaking and am interested into learning about servicing movements. I live in the Milwaukee area and was thrilled to see MATC (local trade school) on lists of schools that teach watchmaking -- just to have that dashed when I contacted them and the class has been discontinued for lack of interest  So for now, I have online and book resources to learn. I have a mostly cheap watch collection other than a Longines that I treasure. I have a few different old timex mechanicals I got off of ebay, including 2 from JerseyMo which I saw is on this forum. I have have way more hobbies than time so I'll probably be around off and on. Dan
    • First thing would be to remove the pinions. They are sometimes quite well rivetted, so this may involve turning away some of the rivet or being willing to sacrifice the wheel (it could easily be distorted beyond use in punching the pinion out). Then you need to compare the hole in the wheel you want to use to the diameter on the pinion that will be pressed and rivetted in. If too big it gets tricky, you'll need to sleeve/bush the hole very securely. I would open the hole further, then chamfer both sides, make the bush with an undersized hole, then fit it in. Swage the bush with a convex punch in the hole from both sides, then a flat punch that is larger than the bush. The idea is to deform metal into the two chamfers on the wheel. Finally flatten and clean up. Now open the hole to receive the pinion. If the hole is too small it's easy, just open it up and press/rivett the pinion in.
    • Thanks @jdm its easier if you know the correct name / term, that helps a lot.
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