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Watch Repair Tools & Equipment

Discuss watch repair tools and equipment here. Show off your new tools or discuss care and tool maintenance.

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  1. Balance Wheel Tool

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  2. Basic staking set

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  3. Bay Seller Vintage Stuff

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  4. BB Crystal Press Question

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  5. Beginners bench

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  6. Bench buffer

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  7. Bench Case Back Opener 1 2

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  8. Bench mat

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  9. Bench Mat?

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    • I’m inclined to agree with what JohnR says. But I’d also like to add some of my own cynicism which is that I think that the snake oil manufacturers will sell you anything if they can see a gap in the market.  But, I can see why it makes sense to have something very slippery and less likely to be pushed away than a light synthetic oil. That possibly is more important for high beat movement where there is a greater velocity.  With regards to “which is best”, I don’t think anyone should offer any opinions unless they have revisited work they have completed over a span of several years. I’ve been using 9415 for several years, but I’m yet to investigate its effectiveness long term. 
    • Klassiker, The questions you asked are great questions and questions that should be asked. First off, annealing can be a long precision process. Most watchmakers have come up with various home grown methods over many years. There are some videos by Steffen Pahlow where he anneals material with an alcohol lamp. It has been awhile since I have watched  it but I believe he encased the part with some brass tubing and heated everything with the lamp. I have a computer controlled kiln that can reduce temperature in controlled increments over time. The kiln was expensive and is probably not on the wish list of most watchmakers. The main concept is to reduce the temperature slowly, in steps, over a long time period.  Most watchmakers do not have hardness testing equipment but you will certainly know if the material is "soft" when you machine it. Drill rod is a generic term for small diameter shaft material that has been ground on a centerless  grinder. It is generally offered in Inch, letter and number diameters in relitavely  short (3 foot)  lengths. It is usually offered in oil hardening (O1,O2), water hardening (W1,W2), and air hardening (A1,A2) steels. The O,W and A designators refer to the chemical composition of the steels. It also implies that the steel is to be hardened by quenching in oil, water or air. Since air quenching has the least amount of temperature differential, it produces the least amount of distoration and cracking in the quenching process. It is used a lot in high precision applications such as stamping dies. Water hardening tool steels are far less expensive then the oil and air hardening steels and are used in lower precision applications such as knives and scissors. For some reason the W composition of drill rod has become the favorite for watch staffs.  david
    • I knew that Ronda offers Swiss made movement and Swiss parts movements. Typically the gold colored movements are Swiss made and the silver are Swiss parts. Out of curiosity, I popped the back off and.... Ronda 515... Silver plates.... Swiss in spirit only, lol. Thanks again @yankeedog
    • Well  my Florida brother. I hate to burst your bubble, BUT. Your pro diver  may or may not have a swiss  movement..most likely  it is a ronda 515...which may or may not  have come from Thailand. Ronda,a swiss  company  outsources there.some 515s are swiss,some are Thai. With invicta  it is really  the luck  of the draw. I like  your kirovskie  idea. Just be aware that that watch is not shock  protected..so you can NEVER  drop it.A quick  look  at them online reveals  a movement  that I think is a poljot  2409 with  without  shock protection...these movements  run well  for  a very long time. A have a few that  came in cheapo sixties  watches,that  run as well  or better  than  my cheapo swiss  watches of  the same era.
    • I just got this one and of course the crystal needs to be polished out, but the question is what battery did it take and how is it supposed to stay in place? Is there a battery holder missing? I can set a 39- negative down on it and press the back on carefully and it will run since the positive contacts the case, but surely that isn’t all there is to it. Has anyone else seen one like this? Steve         There is a clip in ring inside the back cover that may be part of the answer.     Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
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