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  • The watch repair course and videos section has moved - if you are a Patron via Patreon or a WRT Subscriber, kindly create an account here: https://www.watchrepairlessons.com, if you have not done so already, in order to continue with your access to the Early Access and Ad-Free videos.

    The Patron and Subscribers section in the WatchRepairLessons.com dashboard (direct link) will detail all your subscription details. 

    This will help me consolidate all my videos under one roof rather than maintaining two separate systems, and it will also help clean up WRT a bit.

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Clock Corner

Post all things relating to clocks in this forum. Yes this is a watch forum, but we still love all things that go tick and that includes clocks.

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  1. Fema Click springs

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  • Recent Topics

  • Posts

    • Good advice from @watchweasol. Most likely a servicing issue rather than a breakage. Imagine your watch as a little engine and where the pivots for the various 'engine' parts run in lubricated (jewel) holes. Over time that important lubrication deteriorates and the engine parts cannot spin freely and the watch does not run. When you tap the watch you give enough energy for the watch to run again and overcome the deficient lubrication but the effect is of course only temporary. What a watch service does is to dismantle the watch, thoroughly clean all the parts, re-lubricate the necessary parts and perhaps replace a worn item like the mainspring. Much like a car service you could do this yourself but you'll need the tools and expertise to do it. Otherwise you have to take it to someone who can service it ... but as a skilled and time consuming job it's not a budget thing. So for most people how they proceed boils down to the value of the watch ... not only in cold monetary terms but also their connection to the watch. Unfortunately with perfectly lovely watches that are not of high value a lot of people decide the service cost is not worth it. A shame as there must be gazillions of watches languishing in drawers out there! 
    • Hi from what you describe it sounds like the watch is a candidate for servicing . A good clean and lubricate. prices vary from repair station to watchmaker, or do it your self but that requires you to set up a repair station, If you wish to continue as a hobby then ok if not out source the repair.
    • Mark has a video about repairing a twisted hairspring, also he has another for bent hairsprings. I haven't tried it yet, it's way out of my skills.    
    • Hello all, I have a Seiko automatic 17 jewel 7005-2000 watch that I would like to wear, however the watch stops from time-to-time and takes a finger tap to get it running again. If the issue is serious, perhaps due to age, and therefor expensive to repair then I'll have to consign it to the 'bits draw' but if there's a chance of an inexpensive repair then I would certainly have the work done. Any ideas? Thanks in advance Kind regards Gordon
    • You carefully lever it off, minding not to damage the hairspring. They are not particularly tight. Levers like for removing watch hands. I have used stanley knife blades before, just go under the hairspring and gently prise it off. Remember to mark where the end of the hairspring sits for alignment refitting it, or it will be out of beat. 
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