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    • I have some A-11 and A-17 watches that served in WWII and Korean conflict.  A couple are still in the restoration phase...so many projects!
    • Actually, they did.  This from the service manual for the 23 movement: That was the advice given, in 1960 something.  The "cleaning fluid" was Naptha, lighter fluid.  These were watches you bought at convenience stores or the paper stand.  They were worth less new than a watchmaker would charge to service them. So, it depends on what Timex you are talking about but the poster didn't say, hence my throw away comment.  Pre-quartz timex were a disposable that no watchmaker would consider working on.  Now of course, those same mechanical movements have a keen following. There's a bunch of really old Timex manuals, including this one available here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B-IKHN7WFKiwLVFQRjQyUUV0bmM?resourcekey=0-nzqewOfKSXbY8z5cFBWx7w&usp=sharing A really awful URL but it still works, rather slowly. 
    • Hi all When I first started on my journey into watch repairs I made two promises to myself, one was to never work on a Ladies size watch and the other was to never work on a Chronograph. Unfortunatly I have become a little bored with no normal sized watches to work on and a bag of Ladies watches given to me at the start of my watch repair journey by a friend of my sons. So desided to see how many of the Ladies watches I could loose parts for. 😎 I actually surprised myself with how many I got stripped cleaned and back together and they even worked, a few ended in the for parts box bcause of either parts lost to the ether or parts found broken, but about 50% are back in working condition, which I must admit was a huge confidence boost as I was sure they were just too small for me to ever think about working on one. Now the point of this post I came across something I had not seen before with the standard size watches.  Below is a picture of two of them, one out of a Swiss Rotery and the othe out of a German watch , can you see the issue. The righthand one, the Rotery has the screws for the Ratchet & Crown wheel marked with 3 lines indicating they are both left hand thread and on the German watch both the screws have no extra marks indicating they are both righthand thread. Howver in both cases all 4 screws were lefthand threads, never seen a lefthand thread screw on the ratchet wheel before (I have only worked on Japanies watches uptil now).  Is this a common practise with European made watches or something unusual.. Thanks for any insite into this. Paul
    • Welcome to WRT forum and good luck with your forey into horology.
    • Timex never gave any such instruction to use lighter fluid.  That is a home grown method and very over simplified. I use a multiple step process and is dependent on condition and type movement.    
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