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  2. Hi from sunny Cornwall. I have just bought a few watches from e-bay with a view to stripping them down and seeing what's what! I may or may not have any aptitude for this pastime, and so in the first instance I'm gonna be sticking to cheap, and fairly cheap seiko's. I've ordered a pair of vintage 5's and a vintage 5 Sportsmatic deluxe diashock. The former because there are thousands of them around, cheap as chips and mountains of spares. The latter because I think it looks gorgeous, in a 60's dated manner! I'd rather not trash the deluxe so it'll sit for a while until I build up some skills & confidence with the other two. Stumbled across Mark on YouTube and have been sucked in by the seeming simplicity of this activity.......however, I know from previous experience that when somebody makes something look very easy, it's usually not! Take plastering for example. It involves making a liquid defy Newtonian gravity and stick, flawless, to vertical, or even overhead surfaces. Looks easy when viewing somebody that has sold his soul to the devil in exchange for that skill. Drystone walling, glass cutting, brain surgery etc etc can all look deceptively easy until you try them. Apart from this intro, I shall probably become a frequent, but silent visitor, a so called "lurker" hoping to pick up the lingo and a lot of tips. The library of Mark's servicing videos seems to be lacking the venerable 7619-9020, I could loan one, if he promised to be careful (-; Pezed
  3. Ok, so in your opinion the downside which I overlooked is excessive weight (for watchmaking, at least) and loss of close tactile feel present in a in mini driver. Makes sense.
  4. Today
  5. Welcome Fitz you are reaching the point of no return.
  6. Hi Check the gong hammer assembly is free, lift each individual hammer and check that it drops smartly not in slow motion, It they are sticky dfismantle and free off. Remove the floating balance unit and clean in Alchohol or the like, There is a good explanation on the floating balance on the net by Howard Millar. I will have a look in the Hermle Manual regarding your mode. l do like Hermle clocks very well made. Then Proceed as explained by Old Hippy, sound advise as always.
  7. So, finally, the trigger has been pulled! After many considerations, I decided to order a brand new Bergeon 5500. You can see it here. Shipping included I paid £128/€144/$162. Not a bargain, but reasonable, I guess. I saw some definitive advantages: * Well tested professional tool. Meaning there's a good chance it will work and work well. * I can shop individual Bergeon dies for various needs as I go (silly expensive, as always), or shop a good quality Aliexpress set. * Shipping within Europe so it should be here within a couple of weeks rather than a couple of months (China). * Seller has 99.9% positive feedback ("Top-rated seller/eBay Money Back Guarantee). I'll let you know what I think when I've tried it! Finally, a big thank you to all of you sharing your experience, knowledge, and opinions in this thread! This is what makes WRT such a great place to be.
  8. I recommend against that for user as screwdriver because it's way too fat and heavy, proper watchmakers driver are thin and light to get a good feeling. Cousins UK have "value" which means copied with attention. Same has Ofrei. I used Indian drivers for years without any problem on Seiko, but that's because these have wider slots than Swiss. Now I'll be getting some brand drivers when bought individually they aren't even that expensive. Very good ones are France made, A*F and others I'm sure can be found for a discount. Then I treated myself to the below, Ebay 202315546239, very nice finishing, handy dressing stone and a storage for blades. It's much better than a flimsy plastic chrome rotating stand that comes with cheap sets.
  9. That old rheostat looks exactly like the speed controller in a very old train set my Dad passed down to me. It was a huge brick of a thing which sadly failed on its first attempt and I never did get around to getting another sorted but still have the train set.
  10. Thought it looked broken . But now i look closer it looks okay. Maybe you should just leave it as is and oil it from inte inside. Sure looks like someone has tried to remove it before. Lots of damage.
  11. Yes I really miss the watch, but I was far more gutted at the police response to the theft, the person who took the watch was caught through c.c.t.v evidence, I had to give a statement about the theft, the thief was apprehended and then given a official police caution which amounts to nothing its a get out of jail free card that the police chose to use in this country which allows them to record the crime as a solved crime and not have to do anything else, it is just used to make the crime figures look good, leaves the victim with nothing and the criminal free to carry on as before. all the thief has to do is admit the theft and agree not to break the law for a year. I then decided to pursue a civil claim against the thief but the police would not release their name and address for me to do that, saying that they had a right to anonymity and it would be a breach of data protection, both these are just excuses by the police, they did not have the right to withhold the information from me, so I had to threaten the police with legal action, they then released the name and address. The standard of justice in this country has gone to the dogs I would emigrate if I was 20 years younger than I am, I fear we will soon be on Donald trumps Sh@7H@le list. End of rant !
  12. Just in case you didn't know, and to save a lot of frustration, I think you're going to need a left hand threaded screw for that.
  13. I'm with @GeorgeC on this i.e. this is not a shock protection spring but simply a retaining clip. This contrasts with ranfft which says that the 712 should have a Kif Protechoc system. It could be therefore that Elgin made the improvement to use a proper protection system later in the movement's manufacturing history.
  14. Ok, so I have read this particular thread eagerly. In particular I found the comments about upgrading screwdrivers enlightening, but I am left with a question. Given the cost of top quality screwdrivers, it makes sense to buy "medium" quality drivers and then upgrade the replaceable bits as needed. My question is this - what about starting with good (or top) quality bits, but mount them in 3-jaw pin vises with bearing swivel-tops? Bear with me here - this is a serious question (albeit one asked in ignorance). Total tool length would increase slightly, and then you would need to label or distinguish between pin vises because they would all essentially be the same with different bits (in this case buying a set of 9 pin vises to make a full "set"). The upside is that you would get: increased torque, a much more ergonomic grip, bearing swivel tops for a fraction of the cost ($6.00 or less per pin vise with a bit of window shopping), and in a pinch you could make do with one pin vise if absolutely needed and just change the bits. Heck, most of the time it would even come with a set of cheap drill bits as a bonus (for use with other projects not watch related). I just don't see the benefit to purchasing horotec screwdrivers (even if I had the money for them) when a 3-jaw pin vise appears to be as good or better for a fraction of the cost... Lacking practical experience, I am pretty sure I am missing something important...would anyone be kind enough to either enlighten me?
  15. A short one today. I was bothered about using rubber seals in the jars. I have never seen the original seal in a National jar, but thought anyway, that cork would have been far more likely. So cork it is. Obviously, you can't buy the seals and Elma (etc.) seals are all the wrong size, so the rest of that cork sheet I had was used, and I cut them by hand. These jars are quite a bit bigger that it's contemporaries and I think that is a legacy from these machines also originally being supplied with clock cleaning baskets, as an option. The jars are around 110mm square with around a 90mm neck size. Don't think I have seen any available as spares anywhere, so likely difficult to get hold of without the purchase of a whole machine. Anyway, I'm happy with these now.
  16. I have a watch with a landeron 48 movement inside and am looking to find an ORIGINAL SETTING LEVER SPRING for it. Thanks for any advice.
  17. I was about to like your post wls1971, until I read the last sentence when you said it was stolen, so instead I will say Ilike the story about how you got the parts for the watch, and to the person that stole it. I lived in Glasgow Scotland from 1997 to 2000 and our flat got broken into and the thief reassembled my mountain bike that I had taken the wheels off to fit it in the cupboard and road off with my Low-Pro camera bag with about £8000 worth of cameras in it and my Waltham pocket watch that I loved and wore most days as I was still getting over a nasty watch allergy I got on my wrist from when I worked in outback Australia. I bought myself a replacement Waltham at the Byzantine markets that used to be in Edinburgh to replace it, but it wasn't as nice as the one stolen. So I have an idea how gutted you must of been to get it stolen.
  18. No! there are dies in the set that fit the lower hole. I use an M6 screw to put a plastic die over an aluminium one (they will be held together by the screw)
  19. I think now these are for Rolex indeed. Few sizes, some very close to the next, including a 31.2mm
  20. From what I can see it looks very dry I don’t see any oil. Have you let the springs down and checked for wear. Not the best of metal in these, its quite soft compared to movement long ago. With the floating balance, make sure it is clean at the ends, normally jewelled at each end. A drop of watch oil in the jewels, then work the balance up and down a few time, the balance must be free. Clock oil on all moving parts this includes the pallet pins and escape wheel teeth. If the clock is cleaned and the springs, I think you will see a big change in the action of the chimes and balance.
  21. Thank you for your introduction and welcome to this friendly forum.
  22. Hi Fitz and welcome to the asylum.
  23. nice work....I am also diving into a course on how to use a lathe
  24. Another dutchie....:) welkom kerel....
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