Geo

Welcome to new members from the Moderators

7 posts in this topic

On behalf of "Watch Repair Talk" moderators, I would like to extend a warm welcome to all new members.  

This is a friendly place with plenty of knowledgeable people who have varying degrees of horological expertise, the great thing is they are willing to share that invaluable knowledge and help one another.

To help us keep things running smoothly, I would ask all new members to read the forum rules and place their posts in the correct sections.

SSTEEL, Cad101, Watchtime and 1 other like this

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thanks for welcome. I am an amateur watch restorer/repairer since 60 years. But never too old to learn a few tricks so I hope to learn from the community. What an asset to new watchmakers to have all this data available at a few clicks. I remember many hours standing behind a watchmaker to see what he did and learn, but slowly. But although I (with experience under my belt) appreciate the easy info, i would like to stress to young people to remain eager to go and do! There is no substitute your fingers to learn what to, and how to do it. And that comes at a price, real costs but also the famous sweat and tears.

I am dutch, live in france and consider english my best language.

 

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Hello from Orange County, California!

Thank you for creating this site. I have been watching Mark's videos on YouTube for quite some time and I appreciate what you are doing for those of us that are intrigued by mechanical watches. I have had a fascination with pocket watches since a very young age and I love watching your service and repair videos, especially vintage watches of all types.

I look forward to learning from this community, and meeting other people from around the world that share my interest and fascination with mechanical watches. 

Cheers!

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New member but I have been viewing most of the You Tube video's by Mark Lovick which helped me fix my first Seiko watch and since have done minor repair on several watches and gaining on watch tools. It started as a curiosity and now its a beginning hobby with buying more old watches on eBay and repairing them, or I should say attempting to repair them. Only issue I have is the old vintage watches are so f#*%^ small, I have a hard time setting the gear train wheels in their proper places. It takes a steady hand, which I don't have, and eye strain that gives me a headache. So stopping every 15 minutes and resting helps but then I forgot which parts goes where!  Damn, getting old is not for wusses. Mark makes everything look so easy but setting the impulse jewel into position for the pallet fork has me pulling my hair out, and not much left. Any secrete or video advising the best or easiest way to do it, would sure be appreciated.

Thank you,

Rob

 

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Hello from Connecticut/USA

I've tinkered with old clocks for years and have always wanted to move into watches. I've followed the Watch Repair Channel and now feel encouraged to make the first step. 

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