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Turning balance staff

The turning ended in a scrap piece but i think this is a good picture :) 


DouglasSkinner likes this

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I've been practicing this very thing!  Your picture looks very nice.  I'm always looking for tips.  I find that turning a good staff depends on selecting the right turning stock: too soft and it will bend, too hard and even the toughest gravers will simply chip and not produce curls.  There's a lot of trial and error in this because most stock gives no indication of its composition by which you can judge.  I wind up annealing and then re-hardening which can cause problems itself; such as requiring a lot of polishing which can affect diameters and lengths.  Would be much obliged if you could show some pictures of the gravers you used to make the example in the picture.

I have an old Boley 8mm (Geneva pattern), a Marshall (American pattern) and a Lorch 8mm (Geneva pattern) lathes.  I have one at school and two in my workshop.

I've also been practicing re-pivoting with, so far, moderate success; moderate meaning I sometimes, with respect to practice pieces, try more than once.

Best of luck to you and,,,keep on turnin'!

szbalogh likes this

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On 3/11/2017 at 7:04 PM, DouglasSkinner said:

Best of luck to you and,,,keep on turnin'!

 

On 3/13/2017 at 6:14 PM, RyMoeller said:

That's quite impressive.

Thank You both. Still i dont have a good piece. Just practicing. Sadly, i dont have much time for this but cant wait to get to bench again :)

I am using a tungsten graver 4x1.7mm stick for rough turning. But according my latest experience i will need some smaller ones for the fine details.

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Beautifully sharp graver.  I always struggle with getting those straight lines when sharpening.

How well does Tungsten work?  It's never occurred to me to use such a graver but Tungsten is hard as hell and holds up under heat.  Are they a pain to maintain?

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Dont have much experience yet but it seems to be an excellent stuff. It is however really fragile! I dont know how it is called when the working piece catches the graver and grabbing from my hand, the cutting edge chips. It chips also if the graver slips from the piece. So great care must be taken to avoid hard pushing and one has to concentrate on the angles at any times. For this the graver must be really-really sharp. Sharpening on the contrarily is a real headache. Dean DK has a great video how to do it. My method is however different and maybe i will show it next time. 

One also need a square graver to be able to maintain the same angle every time. Sadly, i have only this big graver in square, the other tungstens are round. 

I plan to buy a smaller square (2.1mm) from GRS tools. It costs 13 CHF shipped to our country. 

But this weekend i will make another attempt to turn this balance staff finally :) This is a friction fit balance so no need to make an undercut in the balance shoulder for which i would need another graver grinded with smaller angle. 

DouglasSkinner and RyMoeller like this

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I use a GRS power hone to sharpen my gravers.  Haven't tried tungsten.  I usually use carbide or hard steel.  But it all depends on the stock.  There seems to be a divergence of opinion on how hard (temper) a balance staff should be.  Trying to re-pivot a broken staff suggests that, most of the time, the steel is pretty hard, so you need correspondingly hard gravers.

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On ‎3‎/‎17‎/‎2017 at 7:21 AM, szbalogh said:

Dont have much experience yet but it seems to be an excellent stuff. It is however really fragile! I dont know how it is called when the working piece catches the graver and grabbing from my hand, the cutting edge chips. It chips also if the graver slips from the piece. So great care must be taken to avoid hard pushing and one has to concentrate on the angles at any times. For this the graver must be really-really sharp. Sharpening on the contrarily is a real headache. Dean DK has a great video how to do it. My method is however different and maybe i will show it next time. 

One also need a square graver to be able to maintain the same angle every time. Sadly, i have only this big graver in square, the other tungstens are round. 

I plan to buy a smaller square (2.1mm) from GRS tools. It costs 13 CHF shipped to our country. 

But this weekend i will make another attempt to turn this balance staff finally :) This is a friction fit balance so no need to make an undercut in the balance shoulder for which i would need another graver grinded with smaller angle. 

Not familiar with Dean DK.  Would like to watch his video, can you tell me where it is?

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